Volume 20, No.3, Jul 1999

MARITIME STRATEGY OF BANGLADESH IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM

by Mohd Khurshed Alam 

        Commodore Mohd Khurshid Alam is an officer in the Bangladesh Navy.

        Maritime strategy means the sum total of national policies, objectives and  schemes to promote sovereign rights in maritime fields in which the sea/rivers are substantial factors. Naval strategy is but that part of it which determines the movements of the fleet when maritime strategy has determined what role and which part of the fleet must play. The main elements required for maritime strategy are merchant fleet, a fishing fleet, a naval fleet, the shore support such as ship building and ship management, maritime infrastructure, seamen to man the ships and the learning institutions to train the manpower. These issues are discussed in the context of Bangladesh. 

INDO-PAKISTAN SECURITY RELATIONSHIP AND THE KARGIL CRISIS

by A.K.M. Abdus Sabur

           Mr. A.K.M. Abdus Sabur is a Senior Research Fellow at BIISS, Dhaka.

          The traumatic birth of India and Pakistan in August 1947 decisively influenced the security relationship between them in the subsequent periods. An attempt is made in the article to deal with the Indo-Pakistan security relationship with a focus on the nuclearisation and the Kargil crisis. It has been argued that the Kargil crisis has painfully revealed that while nuclearisation has added a more dangerous dimension to Indo-Pakistan security relationship that the two countries will have to deal with, it has not changed the traditional security relationship for the better. One of its  consequences is the continuation of the arms race between the countries-both nuclear as well as conventional and consequential persistence of the threat of war between the two.

 

SUB-REGIONAL COOPERATION IN ASEAN AND ROLE OF PRIVATE SECTOR :  RELEVANCE FOR SAARC

by Abul Kalam

         Abul Kalam, Ph.D., is a Professor, Department of International Relations, University of Dhaka. An earlier version of the paper was presented at a seminar at BIISS on April 26, 1999.

         The paper addresses the subject of ASEAN growth triangles (GTs) focusing on the role of the private sector in the process. The GTs have already generated very important “demonstration effect” on the future of sub-regional economic co-operation, serving as a crucial lesson for economic development, specially of the benefits of complementarity and proximity. The paper also considers the challenges confronting the GTs as a growth model and how the process may be replicated in a region such as South Asia. It  argues that a sub-regional structure, as is being experimented in replication. It is viewed that the engine of growth in sub-regional cooperation and the leading player is the private sector. The task of the member states by and large is one of ensuring sustained growth through political commitment and co-ordination of policies.

 

ECONOMIC CRISIS IN INDONESIA

by Ehsan Latif  .

          Mr. Ehsan Latif is Assistant Professor, Dept. of Economics, University of Chittagong and currently a Ph.D. student, Dept of Economics, University of Manitoba, Canada.

        The objective of this paper is to identify the causes of recent economic crisis in Indonesia. . The economic fundamentals of Indonesia were quite strong before the onset of the crisis. There were however, some problems in the financial sector. Under the pressure of the IMF in the early 1990s, Indonesia embarked on a hasty financial sector reform programme. This reform led to huge expansion of the financial sector in the country. The ratio of short term debt to foreign exchange crossed the critical marks and made the country vulnerable to any liquidity crisis. The financial crisis started from Thailand. Initially, Indonesia tackled the government and wrong prescription on the IMF pushed the country into deep trouble. Political uncertainty and food shortage all aggravated the problem.


RUSSIAN-CHINESE STRATEGIC COOPERATION: THE MIGRATION PROBLEM IN PERSPECTIVE

by Vasily V. Mikheev

           Vasily V. Mikheev, PhD., is Head. Group for globalization and Regionalism, Institute for Far Eastern Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow.

          During 1995-1998, Russian-Chinese relationship entered a new stage of the development. Moscow began to look at China in the light of Russian-American dispute on NATO enlargement eastward and signs of tension in Russia’s relations with the West. The conception of “strategic cooperation “ with China- contrary, or in addition- to cooperation with the west, was included into Russian foreign-policy baggage. Nevertheless, in Russia, there is no single understanding of the content and goals of the Russian-Chinese strategic separation. While assessing the Russian approaches to China from military-political, military-economical and economical perspectives, the paper also looks into the role of the pressing issue of illegal Chinese migration into Russian territories. The paper makes a plea for intergovernmental co-operation on the question of migration.