BIISS JOURNAL, VOL. 25, NO. 3, JULY 2004 : 207-236

Narottam Gaan

POST-IRAQ WAR WORLD ORDER: AMERICAN SCRIPT, PAX ROMANA OR PAX BRITTANICA?
Abstract
The end of the Cold War and the disintegration of former Soviet Union raised new hopes and vision about a new world to be based on more democratisation of the prevailing political and economic order, justice, equity, and judgment of issues on the basis of merit in a dispassionate and objective way quite unfamiliar with the Cold War. Such hopes soon disappeared with the US rising from embers of Cold War with new vigour and strength to enact its own script of world order. The very prophecy about the emergence of a multipolar world or a multilateral approach to international crisis did not come true as America launched an attack on Iraq in 1991 under a façade of UN backing. Fears were raised about the emergence of a unipolar world. But when America launched the second attack on Iraq in 2003 on the pretext of disarming Iraq of its alleged weapons of mass destruction in the face of stiff opposition from almost all quarters of the world including the Security Council, the final denouement of a unipolar world was enacted. America’s avowed determination to promote democracy and its own version of economic order in countries ruled by undemocratic and authoritarian regimes by military means has drawn vitriolic attacks from critics and raised a debate on whether America is likely to play a more interventionist role in the prevailing and future international scenario.


Narottam Gaan, Ph.D., is Reader in Political Science, M.S. College Baramba, Orissa. His e-mail is : narottam@email.com
Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2004



M A Razzak

SMALL NAVIES IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD: CHALLENGES AND OPTIONS

Abstract
Among the navies of the world, small navies of the developing countries dominate the number. Naval development is a costly enterprise. Navies of the developing countries are small but problems are big. Maritime nations in the developing countries could not ignore the necessity of having a navy though other social needs have been high on national agenda. The problem is compounded because the maritime nations in the developing world happen to be resource-strapped and they cannot provide critical resources as required. Shortfall in the availability of resource ultimately slows down the pace of naval development to the extent one may desire. Besides resource, other national and international factors also complicate navies’ growth. To survive all these problems, navies need to address wide range of issues: identifying the need, planning acquisition, selecting the source of acquisition, integrating and interfacing human resource with the technology, managing critical resources and so forth. Eventually, these issues stand as challenge in their effort to naval development. To meet diverse challenges involved in naval development, small navies of the developing countries need to focus on various facets of naval management.


M. A. Razzak, (BN) is a Commander in the Bangladesh Navy. His e-mail : safera69@hotmail.com
Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies(BIISS), 2004

 


Sumaiya Khair

ENSLAVEMENT ACROSS BORDERS: THE CASE OF TRAFFICKING IN WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN BANGLADESH


Abstract
Over the years, trafficking of women and children has gained considerable importance as a humanitarian and social security issue in Bangladesh. Unemployment and abject poverty have instigated labour migration and international trafficking of women and children who are sold into virtual slavery where they are treated, transferred and traded as merchandise. Although there is no reliable quantitative data that indicate the extent of human trafficking in Bangladesh, findings of media reports and NGOs working in this area reveal that trafficking of women and children from Bangladesh into bordering areas and beyond has spiralled to alarming propor-tions in recent times. The present paper attempts to analyse the underlying dynamics of the problem of trafficking in women and children, and explores the ways of means of dealing with the problem.


Sumaiya Khair, Ph.D., is Associate Professor, Department of Law, University of Dhaka. Her e-mail: skhair@bangla.net
Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies(BIISS), 2004

 


Khandakar Q. Elahi
M. Lutfar Rahman*

MICROCREDIT’S VISION OF A POVERTY FREE WORLD


Abstract
In the current development discourse, critical controversies exist about the poverty-alleviating ability of microcredit programmes. While the proponents claim that they can create a poverty-free world by economically and socially empowering the rural poor, particularly poor women, the critics argue that these small loan programmes are unable to make a ‘major dent’ in the pervasive poverty situation prevailing in the third world countries. To inject some fresh inputs to this passionate debate, this paper reviewed historical development of the microcredit idea and policy, and conducted a conceptual analysis of its poverty-alleviating ability. The analysis agrees with the critics: Microcredit programmes, although unquestionably helping millions of rural women, are unable to achieve their vision of a poverty-free world, because poverty is fundamentally rooted in the social and political structures of a country.


Khandakar Q. Elahi, Ph.D., is Part-Time Faculty, Department of Economics and Social Science, BRAC University, Dhaka. His e-mail: kqelahi@bracuniversity.net.
M. Lutfar Rahman, Ph.D., is a Professor (retired), Department of Agricultural Finance, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh.
Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2004.