BIISS JOURNAL, VOL. 26, NO. 1, January 2005

A.S.M Shahidul Haque

IMPACT OF CHINA`S ACCESSION TO WTO ON TEXTILE TRADE OF SOUTH ASIA


Abstract

China’s accession to WTO will help China take over the textile export market of the world. Experts estimate a loss of $1,051 million to China in export order from Bangladesh alone in next two years. Developing countries in South Asia should work together to address their problems to get special concession to protect their export earning. WTO should accept the fact that, production of and trade in textiles and clothing cannot continue only to serve the interests of multi-national merchandisers and retailers in a handful of consuming nations. Instead, any strategy for the future must ensure that the benefits of production are fairly shared, where the workers involved can afford to become consumers, thus helping the mechanisms for sustainable development.


Mr. A S M Shahidul Haque MBA, is working as Manager-Marketing, at Jamuna Group (Spinning Division). His email is : lincolnsh@yahoo.com.

© Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2005.


Mohammad Jasim Uddin
Laila Ashrafun Jaya

CONDITIONAL AID AND GOOD GOVERNANCE : EXPLORING THE LINKAGES

Abstract

Foreign aid has played an important role in world development since the 1940s. The prime argument in support of foreign aid is that it can eliminate poverty of the recipient countries by fostering development. However, the debate persists as to whether aid which almost inevitably is tinged with conditionality actually promotes development. Since 1980s a new conditionality of the aid package has been attainment of good governance. The main objective of this paper is to analyze whether conditional aid brings good governance or not. The findings based on cross-country evidence tend to suggest that conditional aid did not have expected impact on good governance.


Mohammad jasim Uddin and Laila Ashrafun Joya are Assistant Professors. Dept of Sociology, shahjalal University of science & Technology (SUST). Sylhet, Bangladesh. The paper was developed while the authors were doing Master of Development Studies (MDS) at the Uppsala University, Sweden. Their emails are: Miauddin@yahoo.com and as joua@yahoo.com respectively.

© Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2005.


Mahfuz Kabir

CONCEPTUALIZATION AND MEASUREMENT OF FOOD SECURITY: THE CONTEXT OF BANGLADESH

Abstract

Food security, traditionally identified and measured by availability, accessibility, and utilization and referred to demand failure as its origin, has been critically assessed in this paper focusing the context of Bangladesh. It argues that food security can neither be solely represented by aggregate or per capita availability, poverty, and nutritional status, nor can it be explained by market failure; it is a joint and coincident outcome of market, state and societal failure. Although Bangladesh has attained near self sufficiency in food production, about half of its population is still food insecure in terms of accessibility and utilization, and women are disproportionately affected by food insecurity. There is geographical variation in food security. Finally the paper suggest that not only traditional transfer programs and productivity gains, there is a strong need for institutional reform, favorable macroeconomic environment, proper government intervention and strong social capital to effectively address food insecurity of the country.


Mahfuz Kabir is a Research Officer at the Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS). His e-mail is mahfuz@biiss.org

© Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2005.


Mashuda khatun Shefali
Rukhsana Ahmed and John Barkdull

THE GENDER DIMENSION OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT INSTITUTION IN BANGLADESH

Abstract

Bangladesh has adopted policies to increase women’s participation in local government, but women continue to face significant obstacles to full enjoyment of their political rights. This paper reports original research that assesses women’s experience in local government. Survey research, focus groups, and elite interviews have yielded data showing that structural, cultural and gender bias barriers prevent women from participating in local government as equals to men. The paper outlines the constitutional framework for women’s role in local government, presents the results of field research, and concludes with recommendations for improving women’s participation.


Mashuda Khatun Shefali is Executive Director, Nari Udjog Kendra (NUK), Dhaka. Her email : nari@bangla,net. Ms. Rukhsana Ahmed is Assistant Professor, Department of International Relations, University of Dhaka, Currently on study leave pursuing PhD in Communication Studies at Ohio University, USA. E-mail. ra346096@ohio.edu John Barkdull, PhD, Associate Professor, International Relations. Department of Political Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409. His e-mail: John barkdull@ttu.edu

© Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2005.


Md. Shamsul Islam

FUTURE OF CLASH OF CIVILIZATIONS

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to discuss the future of clash of civilizations and to emphasize the need for dialogue between civilizations. It first illustrates the essential points that now concern Islam as a factor in current international politics. First, the resurrection of Islam in global agenda is seen as a reaction to Western materialism and decaying culture. Second, it is the Muslim’s inability or failure to respond to the Western modernization processes which is viewed as the factor for its resuscitation. The author argues that the future of clash of civilizations depends on two determinants - ongoing war on terrorism; and prospect of democratization and political legitimacy in the Muslim World. The author also argues that the paradox in Muslim societies is that the political elites always use religion to achieve their goals, on the one hand but violate the Islamic religious principles, on the other. By emphasizing the need for dialogue the author concludes that the politics and promises of dialogue depend much on how the parties, i.e. Islam and the West, tend to evaluate each other.


Md. Shamsul Islam is Research Fellow at the Banglaesh Institute of Instrnational and Strategic Studies(BIISS). His e-mail contacts are shamsul @biiss.ord; shamsul90@yahoo.com
An earlier version of the paper was presented at an international conference on “Europe and the Muslim World: The Role of Dialogue” held at the Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabad during 7-8 October 2004, organised by the Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabad and Hanns Seidel Foundation, Munich, Germany.

© Bangladesh Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS), 2005.