Volume 22, No.1, January 2001

PROBLEMS OF DEMOCRACY ; ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM AND CORRUPTION

by Mohamunad Mohabbat Khan.

            Professor Mohammed Mohabbat Khan. Ph.D. is a Member. Bangladesh public Service Commission, Government of Bangladesh.

          In many democracies far-reaching administrative reforms have failed to materialize. Desire to maintain the status quo by both politicians in power and senior civil servants,independent bases of bureaucratic power. Increasing scope of bureaucratic intervention in the daily lives of citizens organized resistance with the civil service and lack of interest of civil society have contributed in varying degrees to the non-implementation of reform measure. Corruption in different forms is prevalent in democratic countries The nature and extent of corruption is causing many dangers to democratic systems. Consequences of failed reform efforts and prevalence of wide-ranging corruption have led to decreasing citizen interest in the affairs of the polity and the dominance of the state by few.

 

AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION INTO THE CAUSALITY AND IMPILICATIONS BANGLADESH’S RAPID IMPORT GROWTH WITH INDIA

by A.K.M. Atiqur Rahman, Shamsur Rahman.

          A.K.M. Atiqur Ragman, Ph D. is Associate Professor, Department of Economics, North South University, Dhaka. Mr. Shamus Raman is a Senior Research  Fellow at the Bangladesh  Institute of International and Strategic Studies (BIISS).

         The paper makes an empirical analysis of the causality and implications of rapid growth for Bangladesh’s import intensity with India during the last two decades. It argues that rapid import growth from India is basically associated with diversion of import intermediate, capital and consumer goods at a relatively cheaper cost, and chanced country  ‘s food security. The paper also argues that despite the country’s growing bilateral trade deficit, overall trade deficit is well stabilized within a sustainable range. If , however ,bilateral trade deficit with India is of any concern, measures should be undertaken to enhance Bangladesh’s export to India. In this regard, harmonisation of exchange rates, among other mesures, merits active consideration.

 

NEGOTIATION OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL TREATIES THE ROLE AND INTERESTS OF DEVOLEPING COUNTRIES LIKE BANGLADESH

by Liaquat Siddque.

         Mr. Liaquat A. Siddiqui is  Associate Professor, Department of Law, University of Dhaka and Member. Environmental Law Commission. IUCN (Bonn).   

           The pervasive nature of the gobal environmental problems makes the participial of developing countries in international initiatives an imperative. The industrialized countries of the north are mostly responsible for the creation of major gobal environmental problems. Accordingly, equity issue became crucial in developing the relevant response measures at the international level. Negotiations conducted between the countries of the north and the south in the areas of ozone depletion, climate change and the bio-diversity destruction with a view to developing regulatory regimes, reveal certain fundamental shift in the international community’s treaty practice. During the negations, the south has been relatively in disadvantage position. This article while reviewing the negotiation strategies, draws certain important lessons for developing countries, in general and for Bangladesh, in particular, which can provide important in shaping their future course of action.

 

DEGRADATION OF ENVIRONMENT AS A THREAT TO THE SECURITY OF BANGLADESH; SOURCES AND CHALLENGES

by A.K.M. Abdus Sabu.

          Mr. A. K. M. Abdus Sabur is a Senior Research Fellow at the Bangladesh Institute of International  and Strategic (BIISS) . Dhaka.

        Attempt has been made in the paper to identify the sources of environmental threats to the security of Bangladesh and concrete challenges posed to the country with a focus on domestic, regional as well as global source s. of environmental degradation. Bangladesh is exposed to a of severe threats to its security emanating from a combination of domestic, regional and global sources, As evident from the study. Environmental challenges posed to Bangladesh emanate considerably from the regional and global sources. Therefore, while the mobilisation of national efforts with a view to facing the challenges is indispensable, their success would significantly depend on the actions at the regional and global levels. Ii is argued that Bangladesh’s ability to face the challenges would significantly depend on the ability of the country’s diplomacy to galvanise international support and develop effective-co-operation with the neighbours.